What is it like to live in the aftermath of disaster?



For the people of Fukushima, it means sleepless nights recalling the
punishing jolt and “Iron Wave” that ravaged their homes and families.
It means living in limbo and worrying about radiation contamination.

And yet post-disaster life also is a time to find new jobs, to raise children
and to carry on treasured community customs. This is what a group of
San Francisco State University students learned during a reporting trip
to Japan in August 2014.

These are the stories of the people of Fukushima who are challenging
the odds as if to declare, “We are here.”

Returning to Fukushima with Hope

March 18, 2017 Uncategorized
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Photo of Corinne Morier

Editor’s note: Morier was one of the Facing Fukushima team members, and she returned to teach English to.

What Happens After a Model Pastoral City is Hit with Catastrophe?

March 12, 2017 Uncategorized
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Editor’s Note: Yemenidjian combined what she learned in Fukushima into a larger reflection on the needs of people.

Photo Essay: Revisiting Fukushima

March 12, 2017 Uncategorized
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After the conclusion of this project, Gavin Mcintyre returned to Fukushima, Japan where he took these photos. Dr..

Sharing Paper Walls After an Iron Wave

March 12, 2017 Uncategorized
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Editor’s Note: Yemenidjian combined what she learned in Fukushima into a larger reflection on the needs of people.

Portraits of Fukushima

July 8, 2015 Portraits
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Portraits of people who have dedicated their lives to rebuilding and revitalizing their communities after the Fukushima disasters.

Kazuya Sato

March 6, 2015 oral history
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Kazuya Sato, 21, is a graduate student at Tokyo University. He changed his career path after the Great East Japan Earthquake.